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Continuing Education's Brown Bag Series Continues

UNC Charlotte's Continuing Education department's Brown Bag Series, which began over the summer, continues their lineup of free educational events covering a variety of topics.

The next event, scheduled for December 3 at 12:00 PM, will focus on "The Five Biggest Trends Shaping Your Future." During the one hour seminar, Jason Mink, founder and president of COGNITION, will share what he has learned through running a marketing and web design agency serving for-profit companies and non-profits organizations in a variety of industries. Participants will learn how to identify and understand trends, connect the trends to the challenges they are facing in life and business, and encourage them to take the first few steps to addressing a future that will be very different from the past.

This is event is free and open to the public, though registration is required.

Storrs Gallery to Display Lott’s ‘False Front'

The Storrs Gallery will exhibit "False Front," works by Ted Lott from Wednesday, Nov. 19, through Thursday, Jan. 15.

Lott is an artist, designer and craftsperson; he believes that thinking and making are two sides of the same coin. He served as artist-in-residence at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Kohler Arts / Industry Program, Haystack School and the Vermont Studio Center. Lott received his M.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his B.F.A. from the Maine College of Art. His work encompasses sculpture, architecture, furniture and public art, and it has been exhibited in museums and galleries across the country.

According to the artist, "Craft practices are at once defined and restrained by their connections to tradition. Viewing woodworking in the context of objects made with wood, housing, particularly stick-frame construction, emerges as possibly the most widespread use of the material throughout the modern world. Utilizing these techniques in a studio-based practice, it is my hope to further the conversation on how notions of craft fit into the modern world."