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Heberlig Named Co-winner of Prestigious Award

Eric Heberlig, professor of political science, is a co-recipient of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation’s D.B. Hardeman Prize for the work "Congressional Parties, Institutional Ambition and the Financing of Majority of Control."

The $10,000 Hardeman Prize is awarded for the best book on the U.S. Congress from the fields of biography, history, journalism and political science. Candidates are judged on their contribution to scholarship and to the public's understanding of Congress as well as literary craftsmanship, originality and depth of research. Heberlig’s co-author was Bruce Larson, an associate professor of political science at Gettysburg College.

"Congressional Parties, Institutional Ambition and the Financing of Majority Control" analyzes the increasing role of fundraising in congressional members’ advancement within party and congressional committee hierarchies.

Aluko to Give Annual Maxwell-Roddey Lecture

Yele Aluko, senior vice president of Novant Health and medical director of the Novant Health Heart and Vascular Institute, will present "North Carolina’s Rejection of Medicaid Expansion: Politicizing the Health of Our Society" at 5:30 PM, Wednesday, Oct. 22, in the Rowe Arts Building, room 130. A reception will follow Aluko’s presentation, which is free and open to the public.

As a physician, Aluko specializes in complex coronary interventions, and he is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. He also is a vocal, visible advocate in the effort to address the issue of health care disparities within racial, ethnic and gender minorities in the United States.

The Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture, sponsored by the Africana Studies Department in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, honors its namesake for her pioneering contributions to the development of Africana studies as an academic discipline at UNC Charlotte as the department’s founding chair; she also helped build black cultural institutions in the greater Charlotte area and nationally.