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Spotlight: Nursing Professor an International Hall of Famer

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Spotlight: Nursing Professor an International Hall of Famer

Date Published:
Friday, May 27, 2011

In staking her claim to researching health promotion for vulnerable populations, nursing professor Mary Nies has achieved worldwide recognition. This summer, Nies, the Carol Grotnes Belk Endowed Chair in Nursing, will be inducted into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

“Dr. Nies’ selection into the Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing is a significant acknowledgement of her exceptional research,” said Jane Neese, interim dean of the College of Health and Human Services.

Through funding from the National Institute of Health and other foundations, Nies has focused on health promotion across the lifespan for vulnerable populations. She is the author of the textbook “Community/Public Health Nursing” and a member of Sigma Xi Scientific Research Honor Society. In addition, Nies is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the Academy of Health Behavior.

Nies will be one of 15 honorees recognized during the Sigma Theta Tau’s 22nd International Nursing Research Congress in July. Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society of nursing, is a nonprofit organization; its mission is to “support the learning, knowledge and professional development of nurses committed to making a difference in health worldwide.”

Dr. Nies’ selection into the Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing is a significant acknowledgement of her exceptional research.
Jane Neese, College of Health and
Human Services

Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame inductees are selected based upon their demonstrated long-term impact as nurse researchers and their funded program of research on patient/family outcomes, community wellness and/or health care policy nationally and/or internationally; their influence as a mentor/role model for students, faculty and practicing nurses; and their recognition as scholars/leaders in research nationally and/or internationally.

Today’s School of Nursing was born on April 17, 1964, when Charlotte College was authorized by the NC State Board in Higher Education to offer a four-year program
leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Members of the nursing community and especially the nurses at the Charlotte Health Department wrote letters of support for creating the program. Under the direction of President Bonnie Cone, a nurse was
appointed chair of the Department of Nursing and seven students were enrolled in the
first course in the spring semester of 1965. Today the school offers bachelor’s, master’s
and doctoral degree programs; it enrolls more than 200 graduate students and more than 300 undergraduates.