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Architecture Faculty Explore 'Diversity and Design'

"Diversity and Design: Understanding Hidden Consequences," being released this month by Routledge Press, features work by two professors in the UNC Charlotte School of Architecture. Edited by Assistant Professor Charles Davis II, with Beth Tauke and Korydon Smith, it includes chapters by Davis and by Associate Professor Peter Wong.

In 15 case studies, Diversity and Design investigates how gender, race, class, age, ethnicity, disability and other factors influence design decisions in all platforms, from product and graphic design to architecture and urban design, and how those decisions affect diverse members of society. According to the editors’ Introduction, "Diversity and Design" presents four purposes: revealing unintended consequences, pluralizing voices and canons, empowering underserved groups and promoting identity development.

The book is available Wednesday, Oct. 21, in hardback and paperback versions.

CTI to Explore Latinos in the New South

The southeastern U.S. is now the nation’s fastest growing Latino region, with many historians calling this cultural shift the South’s biggest post-Civil Rights story. To better understand this powerful transformation, Charlotte Teachers Institute (CTI) joins Levine Museum of the New South in exploring the impacts of Latinos on the New South and of the New South on Latinos, in CTI’s Exploding Canons interdisciplinary speakers program.

The event is set for 5:15 – 9:00 PM, Tuesday, Oct. 27, at Levine Museum, 200 E. 7th St., Charlotte. Click here for more information and to register.

"Levine Museum is delighted to partner with Charlotte Teachers Institute to explore the growth and influence of Latinos in Charlotte and across the South," said Emily Zimmern, President, Levine Museum of the New South. "We deeply value CTI's engagement with teachers, professors, students, community members and business leaders around questions of identity and change among Latinos. What a great way to encourage our community to think differently about who we are."