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Program Provides Free Health Screenings for Seniors

Hundreds of Charlotte seniors will receive detailed screenings and critical health interventions through the Department of Kinesiology’s Health Risk Assessment Lab as part of a new program funded by the Sharon Towers Continuing Care Retirement Community.

A donation of more than $150,000 from Sharon Towers will pay for four graduate assistants and equipment for health risk assessments in Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation senior and multigenerational centers. The new assistants will join two already working in senior centers across the county.

"An exciting aspect of the free program is that it includes at-risk populations in greater Charlotte who may not otherwise have immediate access to such services," said Scott Gordon, chair of the UNC Charlotte Department of Kinesiology. "Our goal is to provide individualized feedback and education to all participants concerning their health risk numbers, and then reduce their risk through an exercise program or referral to their physicians when necessary."

Researcher Uncovers Clues that Cause DNA Damage

Frogs and their tiny eggs are helping a UNC Charlotte researcher unlock the mysteries of genomic instability, with implications for cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.

Biological sciences assistant professor Shan Yan researches DNA damage that human cells sustain from thousands of internal and environmental assaults each day. Researchers know that the body’s cells have a complex set of processes that constantly assess the damage and make repairs to fragile genetic material. “The main question we try to answer is how genomic integrity is maintained,” Yan says. “All living organisms have a genome, which must maintain its integrity in response to damaging agents, such as oxidative stress or chemotherapy drugs. The process is not well studied and there are many unanswered questions, which is why we are interested.”

Click here to learn more about this important research.