Header Search U N C C . E D U

Main Content

UNC Charlotte is on YouTube

'N.C. Coal Ash Forum I' Scheduled for Dec. 4

Professional Engineers of North Carolina (PENC) and the UNC Charlotte Energy Production Infrastructure Center (EPIC) will hold the “N.C. Coal Ash Forum I" from 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM Thursday, Dec. 4, in the EPIC building. A free public information workshop will be from 6:00 - 8:00 PM, Wednesday, Dec. 3. Billed as an interactive forum, the event will give all stakeholders an opportunity to talk about the impact of the recently enacted coal ash management legislation and to facilitate future informed decisions around remediation and clean-up, stated organizers.

The Dec. 4 agenda will feature a keynote address by John Daniels, chair of the Lee College Department of Civil Environmental Engineering in the Lee College of Engineering. Panel discussions include "Where Policy Meets Practice" with Reps. Chuck McGrady, Rick Catlin and Mike Hagar joined by practice scientist and engineers; "Coal Ash Pond Closures: Considerations and Best Practices," with regional and national experts in the engineering and construction fields; and "Beneficial Use, Encapsulated Structural Fills and other Sustainable Approaches to Coal Ash Management" that will feature a discussion on current practices and innovative technologies.

Storrs Gallery to Display Lott’s ‘False Front'

The Storrs Gallery will exhibit "False Front," works by Ted Lott from Wednesday, Nov. 19, through Thursday, Jan. 15.

Lott is an artist, designer and craftsperson; he believes that thinking and making are two sides of the same coin. He served as artist-in-residence at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Kohler Arts / Industry Program, Haystack School and the Vermont Studio Center. Lott received his M.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his B.F.A. from the Maine College of Art. His work encompasses sculpture, architecture, furniture and public art, and it has been exhibited in museums and galleries across the country.

According to the artist, "Craft practices are at once defined and restrained by their connections to tradition. Viewing woodworking in the context of objects made with wood, housing, particularly stick-frame construction, emerges as possibly the most widespread use of the material throughout the modern world. Utilizing these techniques in a studio-based practice, it is my hope to further the conversation on how notions of craft fit into the modern world."