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Family-Friendly Library Room Opens

The Andersen Nontraditional Scholarship for Women's Education and Retraining (ANSWER) is awarded to local mothers who are earning their first four-year degree in any field, and it is one of the few scholarship programs in the United States exclusively for mothers with school-age children. Susan Anderson, ANSWER founder, said she is committed to helping women who are raising school-age children to fulfill their dream of a college degree, and at the same time, create the desire, expectation and priority of a college degree for their children, too.

In response to this mission, ANSWER recently partnered with J. Murrey Atkins Library and the Office of Adult Students and Evening Services (OASES) to establish a family-friendly library room as a resource for nontraditional students and their children (up to age 12).

The ANSWER Scholarship Family-Friendly Library Room, located on the library’s second floor, features educational resources such as two computers and desks, a bilingual early literacy learning station, toys, books, LeapFrog educational and Disney movies and more to accommodate up to two families at a time.

Annual Maxwell-Roddey Lecture Set for Sept. 29

Historian Bernard Powers Jr., a professor at the College of Charleston, will present "On Jordan’s Stormy Banks: Racial Violence and the Quest for Home in America" at 5:30 PM, Thursday, Sept. 29, in Fretwell, room 100. This free, public event is the eighth annual Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture, sponsored by the Africana Studies Department.

Powers, who earned a Ph.D. in American history from Northwestern University, teaches courses in American, African American and African diasporic history. He is co-author of "We are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel," which contextualizes the racially motivated murders that occurred in that city in summer 2015.

A book signing and reception will follow Powers’ Sept. 29 presentation. The Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture honors its namesake for her pioneering contributions to the development of Africana studies as an academic discipline at UNC Charlotte as the department’s founding chair; she also helped build black cultural institutions in the greater Charlotte area and nationally.