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CCI to use NSF Grant to Transform Education

The College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) has received a five-year, $2 million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation to fund "The Connected Learner: Design Patterns for Transforming Computing and Informatics Education." This project is a reorientation of undergraduate computing and informatics education to focus on student learning that connects to peers, the profession and the community.

"The project vision is to transform the student entering an undergraduate computing and informatics program from a person with an interest in computing to a person with an identity as a computing professional," said project principal investigator Mary Lou Maher, professor and chair of the Department of Software and Information Systems. "The project will transform faculty attitudes toward education, shifting their attitudes and behaviors away from knowledge transmission and lecturing toward a refreshed approach of developing educational activities that scaffold the computing knowledge and skills to build successful computing professionals."

Water Safety Expert Works to Reduce Drowning

The risk of drowning remains a serious issue for children, but a UNC Charlotte water safety expert is taking part in a national effort to help alleviate that danger. To mark the 100th anniversary of its swimming safety efforts, the American Red Cross has launched a program to cut drowning in half in 50 U.S. cities.

Roy Fielding, exercise science program coordinator and director of aquatics, is helping lead the effort in the Queen City. A 40-year Red Cross veteran, Fielding said parents need to understand the importance of water safety. "It’s huge. According to the CDC, in children ages one through five, drowning is the leading cause of accidental death," stated Fielding.

A recent survey commissioned by the Red Cross showed many Americans overestimate their ability in the water — while 80 percent said they could swim, fewer than 60 percent possessed the basic skills that could save their life. Click here to read more about this initiative.