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Rare Roman Coin Found at Mount Zion Dig

UNC Charlotte's team that has conducted archaeological excavations on Mount Zion in Jerusalem announced the discovery of a rare gold coin bearing the image of the Roman Emperor Nero.

"The coin is exceptional, because this is the first time that a coin of this kind has turned up in Jerusalem in a scientific dig. Coins of this type are usually only found in private collections, where we don’t have clear evidence as to place of origin," said Shimon Gibson, co-director of the excavation and a visiting professor at UNC Charlotte.

The gold coin (aureus) bears the bare-headed portrait of the young Nero as Caesar. The lettering around the edge of the coin reads "NERO CAESAR AVG IMP." On the reverse of the coin is a depiction of an oak wreath containing the letters "EX S C," with the surrounding inscription "PONTIF MAX TR P III." Importantly, these inscriptions help to work out the date when the coin was struck as 56/57 A.D. Identification of the coin was made by the historian and numismatist David Jacobson from London.

Annual Maxwell-Roddey Lecture Set for Sept. 29

Historian Bernard Powers Jr., a professor at the College of Charleston, will present "On Jordan’s Stormy Banks: Racial Violence and the Quest for Home in America" at 5:30 PM, Thursday, Sept. 29, in Fretwell, room 100. This free, public event is the eighth annual Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture, sponsored by the Africana Studies Department.

Powers, who earned a Ph.D. in American history from Northwestern University, teaches courses in American, African American and African diasporic history. He is co-author of "We are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel," which contextualizes the racially motivated murders that occurred in that city in summer 2015.

A book signing and reception will follow Powers’ Sept. 29 presentation. The Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture honors its namesake for her pioneering contributions to the development of Africana studies as an academic discipline at UNC Charlotte as the department’s founding chair; she also helped build black cultural institutions in the greater Charlotte area and nationally.