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University Career Center Launches Hire-A-Niner

The University Career Center has launched Hire-A-Niner, a new online system with a host of advanced features designed to connect UNC Charlotte students and alumni with employers.

Students and alumni can use Hire-A-Niner to connect to more than 7,000 positions each year, including full-time-jobs, 49erships (internships), co-ops, and part-time jobs. New features for students and alumni include a built-in resume creator, resource library, hire reporting, and online career tools, such as Going Global and CareerSpots. Students can log in to Hire-A-Niner using their NinerNet credentials, making access to the system quick and easy. Additional features will be rolled out over the next year, including faculty accounts and career fair registration.

The University Career Center’s Director, Denise Dwight Smith, shares, "Hire-A-Niner exemplifies the focus of our office on supporting the diverse needs of students and employers. By implementing this new system, we will continue to enhance our programs and services related to full-time employment, experiential learning, off-campus student employment, service learning, and mentoring and shadowing."

Engineering Professor Creates Inspiring Artwork

Recently, a painting of an SR-71 Mach 3 jet was added to the stairwell in Duke Centennial. It is the latest creation by Peter Tkacik, an associate professor of mechanical engineering and engineering science in the William States Lee College of Engineering.

Tkacik’s artistic pursuits are a hobby, but he sees them as a source of inspiration for engineering students as they learn more about their future profession. "I sketched growing up, and I've found it to be a valuable skill as an engineer," said Tkacik. "I say that I do pencil CAD; I can draw a design in three-dimension so others can see it."

Tkacik's rendering of the SR-71 is based upon several photographs of the long-range Mach 3 reconnaissance aircraft. The plane is depicted high above the Earth with stars in the background and hangs 40 feet above the marble floor.