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Robinson Named Africana Artist-in-Residence

Local painter Tommie Robinson is the 2015 Africana Artist-in-Residence; this year’s theme for the residency is "Art, Environment and Race."

Robinson will be in residence in the Africana Studies Department from Monday, March 9, through Friday, March 20. During his visit, co-sponsored with the College of Arts + Architecture, and in conjunction with the Latibah Collard Green Museum, Robinson will present "The Art of Environment and Race" at 2:00 PM, Thursday, March 19, in the Cone University Center, McKnight Hall. On March 20, at 6:00 PM., there will be an opening reception for Robinson’s exhibit "Environment and Social Justice" at the Latibah Collard Green Museum (720 Tuckaseegee Rd.) In addition, Robinson will facilitate a number of student-focused presentations on the relationship between his art and the environment, race and issues of social justice.

Described as the "first black artist in the Guild of Charlotte Artists," Robinson works in oil, acrylic, water color, egg tempura and graphite. His art addresses a wide range of issues, from the experience of the Africa-descended population in the United States to urban life, the environment, racism and sexism.

'Umbra' on Display in Student Union Art Gallery

The Student Union Art Gallery will display "Umbra," an on-site installation by Meredith Connelly through Sunday, March 8. A free reception with the artist will be at 4:30 PM, Thursday, Feb. 19; it will feature a performance by opera singer Kelly Hutchinson.

"Umbra" explores the pairing of light and sculpture with sound sensitivity. Though each sculpture is created specifically for the site, "Umbra" is a continuing series. The exhibit was first displayed at the Cornelius Arts Center last summer.

According to Connelly, "the word umbra is Latin for shadow and is used to describe a specific part of a shadow. The title of this piece is based on the idea of designing an illuminated form that pulls the viewer into the shadows of the work, through placement of negative space and the use of internal lighting in the sculpture."