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Rare Roman Coin Found at Mount Zion Dig

UNC Charlotte's team that has conducted archaeological excavations on Mount Zion in Jerusalem announced the discovery of a rare gold coin bearing the image of the Roman Emperor Nero.

"The coin is exceptional, because this is the first time that a coin of this kind has turned up in Jerusalem in a scientific dig. Coins of this type are usually only found in private collections, where we don’t have clear evidence as to place of origin," said Shimon Gibson, co-director of the excavation and a visiting professor at UNC Charlotte.

The gold coin (aureus) bears the bare-headed portrait of the young Nero as Caesar. The lettering around the edge of the coin reads "NERO CAESAR AVG IMP." On the reverse of the coin is a depiction of an oak wreath containing the letters "EX S C," with the surrounding inscription "PONTIF MAX TR P III." Importantly, these inscriptions help to work out the date when the coin was struck as 56/57 A.D. Identification of the coin was made by the historian and numismatist David Jacobson from London.

UI Co-Sponsoring Symposium on Charlotte Migration

Many parts of the Carolinas, including the Charlotte region, are seeing a huge influx of newcomers. Who’s moving in and from where? How are they reshaping decades-old demographic patterns?

The UNC Charlotte Urban Institute is joining several other local sponsors to offer a lunchtime symposium on Wednesday, Oct. 26, that will examine Charlotte-area population migration. Rebecca Tippett, director of demography, the Carolina Population Center at UNC Chapel Hill, will be the key presenter. She regularly writes and presents about the impact of demographic and social trends in North Carolina.

The event begins at 11:30 AM at UNC Charlotte Center City and includes lunch. Cost is $15 for those registering by Friday, Oct. 14, and $20 for later registrations.