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Smith Receives Award for Community Engagement

Heather Smith, professor of geography in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, is the 2014 recipient of the Provost’s Faculty Award for Community Engagement. Established in 2012, the award honors a tenured faculty member whose teaching, research and service embodies the University’s commitment to civic involvement and whose work strengthens the relationship between UNC Charlotte and the larger community.

In the 15 years since she joined UNC Charlotte, Smith has built an integrated teaching, research and service profile that places community engagement at its core. Her research explores how immigrants navigate new lives in new gateway locations, and how receiving communities respond to the needs, expectations and cultural diversity foreign-born migrants bring. Her engaged work in the Charlotte community focuses on the rapidly growing Latino immigrant population and challenges of inclusivity and access. For Smith, the research partnerships she establishes embrace trans-disciplinary and cross-institutional learning in a way that fosters sustained commitment to growth, innovation and the public good.

CTI Explores Lake Norman on Oct. 21

The flow of life along the Catawba River changed dramatically about 50 years ago when Duke Energy created Lake Norman with the construction of Cowans Ford Dam in 1963. The lake and its surrounding region saw small farms, large plantations, mills and more replaced by state-of-the-art homes and businesses, nuclear power structures, and a recreational lake culture – along with less visible changes such as shifting fish populations and a rise in community activism and environmental protection.

Charlotte Teachers Institute (CTI) will plumb the depths of Lake Norman – past, present and future – with "Exploding Canons: Under The Lake" on Tuesday, Oct. 21, 5:30 - 8:30 PM, at Davidson College’s Lilly Family Gallery. This installment of CTI’s flagship speakers series dives deep into the changing social and physical landscapes of Lake Norman and its profound effects on the larger region, with a diverse group of topics and experts .

This event is free and open to the public. Click here for additional information and to register online.